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Self-employment: Keeping one’s job or getting started?

Self-employment Keeping one's job or getting started

Becoming self-employed represents a career change that can be a little scary. That’s why it can be tempting to keep your job for a moment, what is commonly known as a “day job” that keeps some financial security. The choice is not always obvious. Here are some tips based on several personal experiences that can help make the choice whether to take this type of job or not.

Little tips

I have personally had better experiences than others in keeping my job. The main thing I have learned is that you have to love this job at a minimum. Taking a job that is hated by financial obligation is a huge waste of energy in addition to destroying morale. It will hurt you more than help you. Also, a food job should have a reasonable number of hours. It’s not impossible to succeed with a 35-hour schedule a week, but fatigue can quickly take over and you’ll lose efficiency in both jobs and have to sacrifice time in your personal life. family. It is better to reduce the number of hours, even if you want to take a part-time job. Such a job also indicates immediately that you have other occupations and your employer, if it is a good employer, will be more forgiving if you have schedule changes to make. This approach should be taken with the idea that it is a transition and that it is a temporary situation. Finally, if the relationship with your employer and colleagues is good and you feel comfortable doing so, why not talk to them frankly about your plans? Some encouragement and an outside look at your work are not too much. If the relationship with your employer and colleagues is good and you feel comfortable doing so, why not talk to them frankly about your plans? Some encouragement and an outside look at your work are not too much. If the relationship with your employer and colleagues is good and you feel comfortable doing so, why not talk to them frankly about your plans? Some encouragement and an outside look at your work are not too much.

The good sides

Work colleagues themselves can be of great help without even knowing it. Simply by discussing, they can give ideas, contacts, even if your two jobs are not in the same branch. Psychologically, working with colleagues is a great advantage because self-employment is often lonely in the beginning. The most positive side is, of course, financial security. A regular and secure income, even if it is modest, makes it possible not to have any stress with regard to the questions of money. The unexpected is much less frightening and it is easier to invest in equipment for your new career.

The most difficult aspect to manage when you keep your job is the lack of time and flexibility. Making appointments is a little more difficult with another job and time management is more complicated. It can be frustrating sometimes to not be able to go to a conference that would be very helpful to you because you can not change your shift. There is also the possibility that superiors or co-workers may be uncomfortable with your decision and the situation may become difficult at work. Finally, there is also a psychological aspect that should not be neglected: with two jobs, one can easily find oneself always thinking about work. In the same vein, having two jobs prevents 100% from being devoted to a new career and the development of the latter may slow down a bit.

Since every situation is unique, it’s up to you now to weigh it for the sake of keeping a “day job” to help you start your new career.

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